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1 edition of Population dynamics of Calanus in the North Atlantic found in the catalog.

Population dynamics of Calanus in the North Atlantic

Population dynamics of Calanus in the North Atlantic

proceedings of an ICES symposium held in Tromsø, Norway, 24-27 August 1999

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  • 21 Currently reading

Published by Academic Press in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Calanus -- North Atlantic Ocean -- Congresses.,
  • Calanus finamarchicus -- North Atlantic Ocean -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementguest editors, Kurt S. Tande and Charles B. Miller.
    GenreCongresses.
    SeriesICES marine science symposia -- v. 212., ICES journal of marine science -- v. 57, no. 6.
    ContributionsTande, Kurt S., Miller, Charles B.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. 1527-1875, [7] :
    Number of Pages1875
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16025589M

    Throughout the North Atlantic, the copepod Calanus finmarchicus dominates the zooplankton biomass, linking primary production and higher trophic levels. On Georges Bank, the peak abundance of larval (naupliar) stages occurs in March–April and represents a potential source of prey for cod and haddock by: Date Published: Jun Keywords: spring bloom, calanus, copepod, density-dependence, finmarchicus, frequency time-series, georges bank, marine copepod, mortality, natural mortality, norwegian sea, planktonic copepods, population dynamics, population-dynamics, stage-specific mortality, vertical-distribution Abstract: We compare the patterns of stage-specific mortality of Calanus .

    and circulation on the population dynamics of Calanus finmarchicus in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Scotian Shelf: Study with a that may transport it from the deep North Atlantic. Because of this potential for physical‐biological linkage, C. finmarchicus was identified as one of the key species in Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (GLOBEC) research programs for the North Atlantic, including U.S. GLOBEC [e.g., Wiebe et al., ], the Trans‐Atlantic Study of Calanus [Tande and Miller, ], and GLOBEC‐Canada [Mackas Cited by:

    A number of themes emerge: (1) the south-to-north transport of plankton in the northeast Atlantic contrasts with north-to-south transport in the western North Atlantic, which has implications for understanding population responses of C. finmarchicus to climate forcing, (2) recruitment to the youngest copepodite stages occurs during or just.   Abstract. Data from plankton net and Optical Plankton Counter sampling during 12 winter cruises between and have been used to derive a multi-annual composite 3-D distribution of the abundance of over-wintering Calanus finmarchicus in a swath across the North Atlantic from Labrador to Norway. Dense concentrations occurred in the Labrador Sea, Cited by:


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Population dynamics of Calanus in the North Atlantic Download PDF EPUB FB2

POPULATION DYNAMICS OF THE SUB-ARCTIC COPEPOD CALANUS FINMARCHICUS IN THE GULF OF MAINE: DEMOGRAPHY AND MORTALITY ESTIMATION By Cameron R. Thompson B.S. State University of New York at Geneseo, A THESIS Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science (in Marine Biology) The.

INTRODUCTION. The North Atlantic and subarctic holoplanktonic calanoid copepod Calanus finmarchicus is a key food source for many marine animals including the larval stages of cod (Gadus morhua) (Planque and Batten, ; Falk-Petersen et al.,; Heath and Lough, ).In the main cod spawning areas on the Lofoten and Vesterålen Cited by: 9.

A population dynamics model for Calanusjbnarchicus was coupled with a one-dimensional physical and biological upper layer model for phosphate and phytoplankton to simulate the development of the successive dynamics of Calanus, but not the annual biomass.

ulations that stay in the North Atlantic (Carlotti et al. ).Cited by: We hypothesized that both the population dynamics of Calanus and the taxonomic composition of zooplankton vary significantly between more Atlantic and Arctic water dominated regions, which in turn provide di erent feeding conditions for : Kaja Balazy, Emilia Trudnowska, Katarzyna Błachowiak-Samołyk.

We studied the population dynamics of Calanus finmarchicus, Calanus glacialis and Calanus hyperboreus in Billefjorden, Svalbard (78°40′N). All three species reproduced in the fjord with different timing. The maximum abundance of Calanus spp.

copepodite stages peaked on the 11th of July (29, ind m−2). glacialis was the dominant species accounting for 60–80% of the total Calanus Cited by: Continuous Plankton Recorder data suggest that the Irminger Sea supports a major proportion of the surface-living population of the copepod Calanus fi Cited by: The Norwegian Sea is generally warmer than the Labrador Sea because it is influenced more by Atlantic Water inflows from the south, whereas the latter Cited by: Calanus finmarchicus is the dominant zooplankon over much of the north Atlantic, is pivotal in the marine food chain, and has a life cycle that suggests a vulnerability to climate change.

I will present a spatially explicit dynamic model of Calanus densities, driven by circulation, food, temperature and day length. Introduction. The copepod Calanus finmarchicus dominates the biomass of the mesozooplankton of the North Atlantic from Cape Hatteras (80°N) in the northeast (Planque et al., ).Throughout much of its range, this species has an annual life cycle (Conover, ).Individuals spend the winter at depth as pre Cited by:   The Norwegian Sea is generally warmer than the Labrador Sea because it is influenced more by Atlantic Water inflows from the south, whereas the latter receives relatively larger inputs of Arctic Water from the north.

Despite its more northerly location, the spring bloom generally starts earlier in the Norwegian Sea. Within each of the two seas, however, there are Cited by: INTRODUCTION. The North Atlantic and subarctic holoplanktonic calanoid copepod Calanus finmarchicus is a key food source for many marine animals including the larval stages of cod (Gadus morhua) (Planque and Batten, ; Falk-Petersen et al.,; Heath and Lough, ).In the main cod spawning areas on the Lofoten and Vesterålen shelves, off the coast of Cited by: 9.

North Atlantic Books (NAB) is a California-based nonprofit publisher of somatics, spirituality, ecology, social justice, and self-help books since —all titles available online. Ocean circulation is fundamental to the dynamics of a planktonic species’ habitat. The North Atlantic surface circulation system is made up of a series of gyres, encircled by strong boundary currents (Fig.

1a).In the west, the Northwest Atlantic Subpolar Gyre, commonly referred to as the Subpolar Gyre, includes the Labrador and Irminger Seas and is defined by bathymetry to the north Cited by: The influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAG) on 2 major zooplankton species of the eastern North Atlantic and the North Sea, Calanus finmarchicus and C.

helgolandicus (Copepoda, Calanoida. Latitudinal Study 01' Ca/anlls jinmarchiclls in the North Atlantic will be held in order to: a) critically sUlvey present knowledge of Calanus finmarchicus; b) discuss the role of thc population dynamics uf this dominant copepod species in the North Atlantie in relation tu latitudinal variation, hydrography, and fish recruitment.

Introduction Calanus finmarchicus and the three-gyre hypothesis. The calanoid copepod Calanus finmarchicus is one of the most abundant zooplankton species in the North Atlantic (Planque and Ibanez, ), typically accounting for 50–80% of the numbers of zooplankton (Astthorsson and Gislason, ).The species is pivotal in the ecology and trophic dynamics of the N.

Atlantic Cited by:   The North Atlantic Oscillation also impacts population dynamics of C. finmarchi 27, 28, the intensity and frequency of which could be affected by a Cited by: The planktonic copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, is one of the most important multicellular zooplankton species in the northern North Atlantic, based on its abundance and role in food webs and biogeo-chemical cycles.

It is the subject of a book (Marshall and Orr, revised edition, ) and over research articles since its publication.

Population dynamics of Calanus in the North Atlantic: results from 25 the T rans-Atlantic study of Calanus finmarchicus, ICES Jour. Mar. Sci., 57, p.1 1 The North Atlantic Ocean as habitat for Calanus finmarchicus: environmental factors and life history 2 traits 3 4 5 Webjørn Melle1, Jeffrey A.

Runge2, Erica Head3, Stéphane Plourde4, Claudia Castellani5, Priscilla 6 Licandro5, James Pierson6, Sigrun H. Jonasdottir7, Catherine Johnson3, Cecilie Broms1, Høgni Debes8, 7 Tone Falkenhaug1, Eilif Gaard8, Astthor.

zooplanktonic species of the sub-polar North Atlantic Ocean-scale modelling of the distribution, abundance, and seasonal dynamics of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus.Population dynamics of Calanus in the North Atlantic: results from the trans-Atlantic study of Calanus finmarchicus.

Ices Journal of Marine Science. ; 57 (6)–. doi: /jmscCited by: 7. Hainbucher, D. & Backhaus, J. O. Circulation of the eastern North Atlantic and north-west European continental shelf—a hydrodynamic modelling study. Fish. Oceanogr. (Suppl. 1) 8, 1–12 ( Cited by: